Video: Sinheungsa Temple

Hello Again Everyone!!

This video comes to you from the historic Sinheungsa Temple in Yangsan, Gyeongsangnam-do. This little known temple is one of my favourites in the province because it has just so much to see and it continues to grow. Also, and inside the main hall, are historic murals that date back to the 17th century. So follow me as I look around the temple grounds.

And for more information on this temple have a look at my blog entry here.

Jeongchwiam Hermitage – 정취암 (Sancheong, Gyeongsangnam-do)

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A view of the Nahan-jeon through the twisted red pines at Jeongchwiam Hermitage in Sancheong, Gyeongsangnam-do.

Hello Again Everyone!!

Recently I checked out a few temples online that I would like to explore, and one of those temples near the top of the list was Jeongchwiam Hermitage on the outskirts of Sancheong, Gyeongsangnam-do. So with a full tank of gas, and a really early morning wake-up call, I headed out to the western part of Gyeongnam Province.

Shrouded in a veil of fog, and twisting and turning up a winding road, I finally arrived along the outskirts of the diminutive Jeongchwiam Hermitage (정취암). Jeongchwiam Hermitage was first established in 686 A.D. by the great master Uisang-daesa, which was during the reign of King Shinmun. And it rests on the slopes of Mt. Daeseongsan just north of Jirisan National Park.

Clouded in a haze of fog, I was first greeted at the temple by a white puppy. He was extremely playful and followed me all around the hermitage grounds. Occasionally, he would nibble at my feet and he even followed me into the main hall. He was a nice little companion to have throughout the temple grounds on a rainy and foggy day.

Approaching the temple grounds, besides the white dog that might greet you at the entrance to Jeongchwiam Hermitage, you’ll first see the kitchen and visitors centre to your left as you approach the main hall. Next to the kitchen and the visitors’ centre is the smaller sized main hall. Wrapped around the main hall are the Palsang-do set of murals that are simple, yet, beautiful in their composition. As you enter the main hall, you’ll first be greeted by a fairly modest guardian mural. Sitting in the centre of the main altar is a single statue of Gwanseeum-bosal (The Bodhisattva of Compassion). The smaller sized main altar statue sits on a red satin pillow and it’s made of wood. And while there is no clear sign of when it was created, it is Gyeongnam Province Material Treasure #314. To the left of this smaller sized golden statue is a mural of Jijang-bosal (The Bodhisattva of the Afterlife). This beautiful mural is fronted by a statue of the same Bodhisattva, Jijang-bosal. Of note, the ceiling of the main hall is beautifully decorated with pink and golden paper lotus lanterns.

To the right of the main hall is nothing more than the monks quarters; however, out in front of the main hall, on a fog-clear day, are some beautiful views of the mountainside. Between the hermitage’s kitchen and the main hall, as the dog led, are a set of stairs that lead to a set of upper courtyard shrines and shrine halls.

The first shrine to greet you, after you’ve ascended the set of stairs, is a stone sculpture dedicated to Gwanseeum-bosal as well as a collection of Buddhist themed figurines left behind by hermitage visitors. To the left of this shrine is a hall dedicated to the Nahan (The Disciples of the Historical Buddha). Around the exterior of this hall are various landscape murals and murals dedicated to the Nahan. As for the interior of the Nahan-jeon, there’s a elegant statue of Seokgamoni-bul (The Historical Buddha) sitting alone on the main altar. He’s surrounded by equally elegant statues of the various Nahan. And the Nahan statues are backed by two separate murals dedicated to the various Nahan.

To the right of the Gwanseeum-bosal stone statue shrine, and up a set of natural rock stairs, is the crown jewel, in my humble opinion, of Jeongchwiam Hermitage. Through the opening, and next to a beautifully twisted pair of red pines, is the San shin-gak/Samseong-gak. I know, it’s a bit of a strange name for the shaman shrine hall, but they are the names of the two name plates that hang above the entrance to the single hall. If you decide to enter this hall, you’ll be greeted by the Chilseong (The Seven Stars) mural to the left and the Dokseong (The Recluse) mural hanging on the far right wall. Slightly askew, and to the right, is a window that looks out onto a shrine dedicated to San shin (The Mountain Spirit). On top of the mountain rests a striking statue dedicated to San shin; however, it’s the painting below it that makes this hermitage truly stand out. The painting, which is also dedicated to San shin, dates back to 1833; and while I know there are a handful of older paintings dedicated to San shin, this is the oldest mural of this shaman deity that I’ve seen in person. It truly is something to behold.

The other thing that you can enjoy from this shaman shrine hall are the scenic views of the valley below and the winding road that you drove up on to get to the hermitage.

Admission to the hermitage is free.

For more on Jeongchwiam Hermitage, follow this link.

HOW TO GET THERE: First, you’ll have to get to Habdong Bus Terminal in Sancheong. From this bus terminal, you’ll have to take a taxi to Jeongchwiam Hermitage. The ride should cost about 10,000 won and take around 25 minutes (or 12 kilometres in distance). Just make sure your taxi driver hangs around after dropping you off; otherwise, it might be a pretty long walk back to the terminal.

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OVERALL RATING: 7.5/10. The highlights to this temple is the golden wooden statue of Gwanseeum-bosal inside the main hall, and for me personally, the San shin mural that dates back to 1833. However, the sheer location of the hermitage during a foggy day, the views, and the elegance of the Nahan-jeon make this hermitage a must if you’re in the western part of Gyeongnam Province.

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The temple courtyard as you approach it. In the centre is the diminutive main hall.
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The playful white dog that may follow you around the hermitage grounds.
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A look inside the main hall.
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The historic, yet small, Gwanseeum-bosal that sits on the main altar.
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The Jijang-bosal statue and mural to the left of the main altar inside the main hall.
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The simplistic guardian mural to the right of the main altar.
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The Gwanseeum-bosal shrine as you ascend the stone stairs to the upper courtyard at the hermitage.
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A look over at the Nahan-jeon through a cluster of trees.
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A look inside the Nahan-jeon and the statue of Seokgamoni-bul (The Historical Buddha) that sits on the main altar.
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A look up at the San shin-gak and past the Gwanseeum-bosal shrine.
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Through the twisted red pines, you’ll be able to see the lower courtyard from the San shin-gak.
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Finally, a look at the San shin (The Mountain Spirit) shrine at Jeongchwiam Hermitage.
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And a look at the mural of San shin that dates back to 1833.
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The darkened view from the San shin-gak.
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And a look over at the twisting road that leads you home.

Baekyangsa Temple – 백양사 (Jung-gu, Ulsan)

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The amazing main hall at Baekyangsa Temple in Ulsan.

Hello Again Everyone!!

While finalizing my itinerary for my trip to temples in Ulsan, I came across Baekyangsa Temple by chance. While scouting out another temple in the downtown area of Ulsan, I came across this little known gem. And boy, was I really happy that I did discover it, because it quickly became the highlight to my little adventure to Ulsan.

Baekyangsa Temple (백양사) is situated near the city centre of Ulsan. And it’s a rather large temple compound with numerous buildings. As you first approach the temple grounds off of the neighbouring city street, and make your way past the compact bell pavilion that sits near the temple parking lot, you’ll be greeted by the face of a beautifully adorned shrine hall. It isn’t until you pass through one of the two entrance gates that you realize that this building is the Gwaneeum-jeon hall dedicated to Gwanseeum-bosal (The Bodhisattva of Compassion). The exterior is one of the most beautifully adorned halls in all of Korea with elaborate paintings of animals, the Four Heavenly Kings, and paintings of Gwanseeum-bosal. It’s should also be noted, that all of the temple buildings at Baekyangsa Temple are adorned with my favourite Buddhist painter’s murals. As you step inside of the sparsely decorated Gwaneeum-jeon, you’ll notice the main altar to your right. It took me a bit to realize that the flame standing statue was that of Gwanseeum-bosal. The reason it took me a bit to realize which Buddha or Bodhisattva it was, was that this statue of the Bodhisattva of Compassion is one of the most feminine statues of this Bodhisattva that I have yet to see in all of Korea. And she is backed by an equally eloquent painting of herself joined by Yongwang (The Dragon King).

As you step out of this hall, and back into the temple courtyard, you’ll notice the main monks’ residence to your immediate right. This hall is adorned with beautiful Shimu-do (Ox-Herding) murals. And to your immediate left are numerous buildings like the monks’ quarters for the rest of the temple’s monks as well as the kitchen and administration office at the temple.

But by far the highlight of this temple is the amazing main hall, which doesn’t even do the hall justice in words. Out in front of the main hall are a variety of stone statues like twin elephants, the eightfold path wheel, and the 12 zodiac generals, as well as Biseon, and massive stone lanterns. As you approach the main hall, you’ll realize just how intricate the dancheong paintings are. In addition to the colours, you’ll be greeted by some of the finest renderings of the Shimu-do paintings in all of Korea. In addition, there are equally amazing paintings of various Buddhas and Bodhisattvas on the exterior walls of the main hall. As you step into the main hall, you’ll be greeted by five large statues on the main altar. In the centre is Seokgamoni-bul (The Historical Buddha). He’s flanked by Munsu-bosal (The Bodhisattva of Wisdom) and Bohyun-bosal (The Bodhisattva of Power). And book ending these three central statues are Jijang-bosal (The Bodhisattva of the Afterlife) to the left and Gwanseeum-bosal to the right. To the far right is the guardian painting which is fronted with a fierce looking bronze guardian statue.

To the left of the main hall is the Nahan-jeon dedicated to the 16 Nahan (The Disciples of the Historical Buddha). Wrapped around the exterior walls to this hall, once again, are some of the finest Palsang-do murals in all of Korea. As for the interior, and rather conveniently, are the 16 Nahan statues with each of their names written in Korean. These sixteen statues surround a triad of statues that sit on the main altar. In the centre of these smaller sized statues is Seokgamoni-bul.

And to the right of the main hall is the Myeongbu-jeon hall. Around the exterior of the hall are various murals that depict an individual from younger age to older age with his aging mother. Also, and probably one of the most spectacular paintings in all of Korea, is the Dragon Ship of Wisdom that adorns the right exterior wall to this hall. As for the interior, there are large sized statues of the 10 Kings of the Underworld that join a statue of Jijang-bosal that sits all by himself on the main altar to this hall. Much like the Nahan, the 10 Kings of the Underworld conveniently have each of their names beside the corresponding King.

And next to this hall is a shaman hall that houses both the Chilseong (The Seven Stars) mural in the centre and a Dokseong (The Recluse) mural to the right. Atypically, this hall also houses a mural, to the left, of the founding monk at Baekyangsa Temple.

Finally, and up a side-winding set of stairs, fronted by a tacky and fading picture of a tiger, is the San shin-gak. It’s from this vantage point, from the San shin-gak, that you get a great view of Ulsan. As for mural inside of the San shin-gak of its namesake, San shin (The Mountain Spirit), is a ghost-like mural of the usually healthy deity.

HOW TO GET THERE: The directions to Baekyangsa Temple, like some temples in Korea, are pretty difficult. First, from the Ulsan Train Station, you’ll have to get to the Ulsan City Police Station Headquarters (Ulsan Jibang Gyeongchalcheong), where you’ll have to take City Bus #5003. From this bus, you’ll have to get off at the Samhogyo Bus Stop. You’ll then have to transfer buses and take City Bus #408 for 6 more stops, where you’ll have to get off at the Gungdojang Bus Stop. From this bus stop, you can walk to get to the Ulsan City Police Station Headquarters, which should take you about five minutes. And from the police headquarters, you can continue to walk another 5 to 10 minutes (or 600 metres) to get to BaekyangsaTemple. Difficult, but not impossible.

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OVERALL RATING8/10. There is just so much to see at this temple that is beautiful from the stunning murals that adorn all the halls, both inside and out, to the ghost-like mural of San shin, to the statues of Gwanseeum-bosal, the 10 Kings of the Underworld, and all the other statues at the temple to make Baekyangsa Temple well worth the effort to visit. In addition to all this beauty, there are also all the statues that sit out front of the main hall, as well as the mind-blowingly beautiful lattice work that adorns the doors to the main hall. There’s a lot to take in artistically at this temple, so have fun!

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Just one of the entry gates that allows you into the temple grounds at Baekyangsa Temple.
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But before you enter, you can have a look at the compact temple bell pavilion with a beautiful bell that’s adorned with the likes of Jijang-bosal (The Bodhisattva of the Afterlife).
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The first hall that greets you at the temple is the Gwaneeum-jeon hall.
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The Gwaneeum-jeon at the temple is adorned with some of the most unique and beautiful murals in all of Korea.  This is a mural of just one of the Heavenly Kings that adorns the hall.
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And this mural of a monkey.
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Inside the Gwaneeum-jeon is this very feminine statue of Gwanseeum-bosal (The Bodhisattva of Compassion). She is perhaps the most feminine statue of this Bodhisattva that I have yet to see in Korea.
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And in front of the Gwaneeum-jeon is the massive main hall that is intricately and gorgeously decorated with various murals and dancheong colour schemes.
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Before you enter the hall, you’re first greeted by various stone statues like this attendant.
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As well as the 12 Zodiac Generals.
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Some of the finest lattice artistry in Korea.
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Inside the main hall resides these five statues on the main altar. In the centre is Seokgamoni-bul (The Historical Buddha).
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To the right of the altar inside the main hall is this bronze guardian in front of the temple’s guardian mural.
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This painting in the Palsang-do set of murals adorns the Nahan-jeon hall.
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A look at the main altar inside of the Nahan-jeon.
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 To the right of the main hall is this hall, the Myeongbu-jeon.
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On the right exterior wall of the Myeongbu-jeon is one of the finest examples of the Dragon Ship of Wisdom.
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Inside, and seated on the main altar, is a statue of Jijang-bosal.
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Next to the Myeongbu-jeon hall is a shaman shrine hall that houses the likes of this painting and statue of Dokseong (The Recluse).
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Up this winding path is the San shin-gak dedicated to San shin (The Mountain Spirit).
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The view from the San shin-gak down at the main hall and at Ulsan off in the distance.
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And a look inside the San shin-gak and the ghostly San shin.

Video: Munsusa Temple

Hello Again Everyone,

Munsusa Temple, located on the outskirts of Ulsan, came highly recommended from a friend. However, it was months before I got around to seeing this temple. But I was really happy that I did finally go out and see it because it was gorgeous with its scenic views, ornate halls, and expert paintings. So follow me as I explore Munsusa Temple.

Munsusa Temple – 문수사 (Ulju-gun, Ulsan)

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The heavenly view from Munsusa Temple in Ulsan.

Hello Again Everyone!!

Munsusa Temple in Ulsan was recommended to me by a friend. Unfortunately, there were several other temples on my to-see list before it. But during my summer vacation, I was finally able to get out to Ulsan and see this mountain-side temple.

Munsusa Temple (문수사) is situated up in the clouds on Mt. Munsusan. You travel up a 6 kilometre long road until you arrive at the outskirts of the temple that is placed preciously on the face of the mountain. It’s as you approach that you’re able to see some spectacular views of the city of Ulsan down in the valley below as well as the cloud and fog covered peaks of Mt. Munsusan.

Before you pass under the bell pavilion, you’ll pass by the kitchen area to the temple. Just past the kitchen area is a trail that leads up to the peak of the mountain. Also, and between the kitchen and the banks of the mountain, is a path that leads up to the monk-only meditative hall. You’ll get a better look at this crowning hall from the vantage point of the main hall.

Finally having passed under the bell pavilion, you’ll be greeted by the large sized main hall and the adjoining visitors centre. Unfortunately, the front of the main hall is adorned with an ugly green Plexiglas enclosure for the numerous visitors that can’t quite squeeze into the main hall. Sitting and standing on the main altar are five statues of various Buddhas and Bodhisattvas. In the very centre is a large sized seated statue of Seokgamoni-bul (The Historical Buddha). The two accompanying Bodhisattvas to the immediate right and left of Seokgamoni-bul are Munsu-bosal (The Bodhisattva of Wisdom) and Bohyun-bosal (The Bodhisattva of Power) [Ed. Thank you Brian Barry for this information]. And the final two, in the set of five, are a standing Jijang-bosal (The Bodhisattva of the Afterlife) to the far left and a standing statue of Gwanseeum-bosal (The Bodhisattva of Compassion) to the far right. And on the far left wall is a large sized guardian painting.

Next to the main hall is the Myeongbu-jeon hall dedicated to Jijang-bosal. But before you enter this hall, you’ll notice an aged pagoda between the two halls. Surrounding the exterior of the Myeongbu-jeon hall are some nicely rendered Ox-Herding murals. As soon as you step inside the Myeongbu-jeon hall you’ll be greeted by a colourful main hall with a green haired Jijang-bosal sitting with a golden staff in his left hand. But the true highlight to this hall are the extremely grotesque paintings for sinners that adorn the interior walls to this hall. Usually, they’re saved for the exterior walls, but a bit of creative license was taken with the artistry of this hall. Of note is the vulture eating the eye out of a sinners head.

Behind this hall, and up a set of stairs, is a stone courtyard with two of the more unique stone statues of Buddhas. On the left is a faceless statue of a Buddha that has been formally smashed into three separate pieces. Fortunately for us, this statue has been repaired. Next to this ancient statue is a newer statue dedicated to what looks to be Seokgamoni-bul (The Historical Buddha). What’s interesting about this statue is the glass orb that he holds in his left hand. Never seen that before.

The final building at Munsusa Temple is the Samseong-gak. Inside, and to the far right, are row upon row of caged electrical candles, which really heats up the hall in the summer. To the left of these electrical candles are paintings dedicated to San shin (The Mountain Spirit), Dokseong (The Recluse) and Chilseong (The Seven Stars). Of note is the highly original colour scheme of the San shin mural

Admission to the temple is free.

HOW TO GET THERE: There’s really two ways you can get to Munsusa Temple. First, if you decided to travel directly from Ulsan, you can catch the Munsusa Temple shuttle bus from the Ulsan Gongeuptop Rotary. It leaves at 8 and 9 A.M., respectively during the weekdays. The shuttle bus will drop you off at the Munsusa Temple parking lot. From the parking lot, you’ll have to walk an additional 500 metres to get to the temple.

The other way you can get to Munsusa Temple is from Busan. First you’ll have to get to the Nopo-dong subway station. From the bus stop outside the station, you can catch either bus #2300, #1137, #1127, or #2100 and get off at the Shinjeong bus stop and walk to get to the Gongeuptop Rotary. The bus trip from Busan to Ulsan will take about 2 hours. From where the bus drops you off in Shinjeong, you’ll have to walk an additional 5 to 10 minutes to the rotary. And then, much like if you live in Ulsan, you’ll have to take the temple’s shuttle bus.

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OVERALL RATING: 7.5/10. By far, the highlight to this temple is the view. If you go on a clear day, you can either see Ulsan and/or the ocean below. And if you go early enough, you can see the fog slowly receding over Mt. Munsusan’s peaks. In addition to all of its natural beauty, the murals inside of the Myeongbu-jeon, the twin statues in the stone courtyard of the Buddha, the set of statues that sit on the altar inside the main hall, and the shaman deity murals inside of the Samseong-gak hall make Munsusa Temple a must see if you’re in the Ulsan area.

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When I arrived, the fog was still lifting from the peaks at Mt. Munsusan. CSC_0963
The main hall as you approach the temple grounds.
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If you turn left, instead of right, when the path forks, you’ll find this golden Buddha just before the stairs that ascend to the monks’ quarters.
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The bell pavilion that you’ll pass under to gain admittance to the temple courtyard.
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A different look at the main hall at Munsusa Temple.
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A look inside the main hall at the five statues that reside on the altar.
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The older looking three tier pagoda that stands between the main hall and the Myeongbu-jeon hall.
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Sitting on the colourful altar inside the Myeongbu-jeon hall is this green haired statue of Jijang-bosal (The Bodhisattva of the Afterlife).
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One of the gruesome paintings that welcomes you to the Myeongbu-jeon.
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And an even more graphic painting of a sinner having his eye plucked out by a ravenous vulture.
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One, of the two, Buddha statues that resides in the upper courtyard at Munsusa Temple.
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 The newer Buddha statue that has a crystal orb in front of it.
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And in the neighbouring Samseong-gak shaman shrine hall is this beautiful San shin (The Mountain Spirit) mural.
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And one last look from the temple courtyard up at the monks’ quarters at Munsusa Temple.

Video: Dongmyeong Bulwon

Hello Again Everyone!!

So not too long ago, I was able to make my way back to Dongmyeong Bulwon in Busan. It is a large, intercity, temple that has a massive main hall, a uniquely designed Cheonwangmun entrance gate, and large shaman shrine halls. So join me as I tour around this beautiful Busan temple.

Sudoam Hermitage – 수도암 (Yangsan, Gyeongsangnam-do)

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The main altar inside of the main hall at Sudoam Hermitage near Tongdosa Temple in Yangsan, Gyeongsangnam-do.

Hello Again Everyone!!

I had once visited Sudoam Hermitage, but they were performing a ceremony, so I didn’t want to interrupt. Recently, I went back to Sudoam Hermitage with a little bit more success. I was finally able to see it. Sudoam Hermitage was the last hermitage I had yet to visit at Tongdosa Temple, and while it isn’t the most impressive, it has enough to keep the temple adventurer entertained.

When you first enter the Sudoam Hermitage (수도암) grounds up an uneven road, you’ll be greeted by a tiny pavilion for meditation. This bamboo pavilion jets out over open air, and has two chairs seated in its midst.

Past this bamboo pavilion, you’ll next be greeted by the hermitage’s facilities like the meeting centre, the kitchen, and the monks’ dorms to your left. And to your right is the hermitage’s garden, which is beautifully framed by the neighbouring mountains. It’s between these two framing set of hermitage structures that the hermitage’s shrine halls are housed.

Straight ahead, and through a pair of overgrown cedar trees, is Sudoam Hermitage’s main hall. This rather long, but narrow, main hall is beautifully adorned with floral murals. As for the interior, and sitting on the main altar, is a triad centred by Seokgamoni-bul (The Historical Buddha). To his right and left, atypically, is Daesaeji-bosal and Gwanseeum-bosal. And to the right of this triad of statues is a guardian mural. And to the left is a beautiful Jijang-bosal (The Bodhisattva of the Afterlife) mural. The entire interior ceiling of the main hall is decorated with some beautiful pink paper lotus flowers. For some reason, they seemed to be a bit more vibrant and beautiful than most other temples.

The final hall at the hermitage is to the left rear of the main hall. This hall is the Samseong-gak shaman shrine hall. This newer looking shrine hall houses the three most popular shaman deities: Sanshin (The Mountain Spirit), Dokseong (The Recluse), and Chilseong (The Seven Stars). Stepping into the Samseong-gak, you’ll be greeted by some unique shaman paintings. Perhaps the most unique, and simplistic, is the Chilseong mural. It’s also from the Samseong-gak shrine hall that you get a beautiful view of the surrounding mountains.

HOW TO GET THERE: To get to Sudoam Hermitage, as well as Tongdosa Temple, you can take an intercity bus from Busan, Eonyang or Ulsan. Specifically from Busan, you can take a bus or subway to Nopo-dong intercity bus terminal. There, you can get a ticket for Tongdosa Temple. It leaves every 20 minutes.  Once you arrive in Yangsan, and facing the very small bus terminal, you should walk left and then turn right at the first corner. The temple entrance is past the numerous restaurants and shops. Walk up a 1.5 km path, sprinkled with ancient graffiti, and you will eventually arrive at the outskirts of the temple grounds.  From the Tongdosa Temple grounds, keep heading up the main road for about 2 kilometres. When the road forks both straight and to the right, turn to the right. Head up the hilly road for another kilometre and Sudoam Hermitage will be on your right. Admission for adults to Tongdosa Temple is 3,000 won, while admission to Sudoam Hermitage is included with your entrance to Tongdosa Temple.

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OVERALL RATING: 5.5/10. While not the most impressive hermitage at Tongdosa Temple, Sudoam Hermitage still has a fair bit for a person to see and explore. The interior of the main hall is beautiful, as are the floral murals that adorn the exterior walls to this hall. Additionally, the view from the Samseong-gak shrine hall and the bamboo pavilion are two more highlights to this little travelled hermitage.

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The bamboo pavilion as you enter the hermitage grounds.
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The hermitage’s vegetable garden and greenhouse.
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The main hall as you approach it.
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A look across the long main hall at Sudoam Hermitage.
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The triad of statues that sits on the main altar. In the centre is Seokgamoni-bul (The Historical Buddha). He’s flanked by Daesaeji-bosal (The Bodhisattva of Wisdom and Power for Amita-bul) and Gwanseeum-bosal (The Bodhisattva of Compassion).
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A closer look at Gwanseeum-bosal.
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The guardian mural to the right of the main altar.
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And to the left of the main altar is this beautiful mural of Jijang-bosal (The Bodhisattva of the Afterlife).
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A look up at the Samseong-gak shrine hall to the left rear of the main hall at Sudoam Hermitage.
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The interesting, and centrally located, Chilseong mural inside of Samseong-gak shrine hall.
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To the left of Chilseong is this mural of San shin (The Mountain Spirit).
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And a look across the main hall from the Samseong-gak shrine hall.